Daily Kos Elections 2022 primary calendar

Below you’ll find Daily Kos Elections’ calendar of major-party filing deadlines, primaries, and runoffs for the 2022 elections. For a chronological version of this calendar, click here. Beneath the table, you’ll find detailed notes on requirements for runoffs, exceptions to filing deadlines, and important conventions. State Filing Primary Runoff Alabama 28-Jan-22 24-May-22 21-Jun-22 Alaska 1-Jun-22 16-Aug-22 Arizona 4-Apr-22 2-Aug-22 Arkansas 1-Mar-22 24-May-22 21-Jun-22 California 11-Mar-22 7-Jun-22 Colorado 15-Mar-22 28-Jun-22 Connecticut 7-Jun-22 9-Aug-22 Delaware 12-Jul-22 13-Sep-22 Florida 17-Jun-22 23-Aug-22 Georgia 11-Mar-22 24-May-22 26-Jul-22 Hawaii 7-Jun-22 13-Aug-22 Idaho 11-Mar-22 17-May-22 Illinois 14-Mar-22 28-Jun-22 Indiana 4-Feb-22 3-May-22 Iowa 18-Mar-22 7-Jun-22 Kansas 1-Jun-22 2-Aug-22 Kentucky 7-Jan-22 17-May-22 Louisiana 22-Jul-22 8-Nov-22 10-Dec-22 Maine 15-Mar-22 14-Jun-22 Maryland 22-Feb-22 28-Jun-22 Massachusetts 10-May-22 20-Sep-22 Michigan 19-Apr-22 2-Aug-22 Minnesota 31-May-22 9-Aug-22 Mississippi 1-Mar-22 7-Jun-22 28-Jun-21 Missouri 29-Mar-22 2-Aug-22 Montana 14-Mar-22 7-Jun-22 Nebraska 1-Mar-22 10-May-22 Nevada 18-Mar-22 14-Jun-22 New Hampshire 10-Jun-22 13-Sep-22 New Jersey 4-Apr-22 7-Jun-22 New Mexico 1-Feb-22 7-Jun-22 New York 7-Apr-22 28-Jun-22 North Carolina 17-Dec-21 8-Mar-22 17-May-22 North Dakota 11-Apr-22 14-Jun-22 Ohio 2-Feb-22 3-May-22 Oklahoma 15-Apr-22 28-Jun-22 23-Aug-22 Oregon 8-Mar-22 17-May-22 Pennsylvania 8-Mar-22 17-May-22 Rhode Island 29-Jun-22 13-Sep-22 South Carolina 30-Mar-22 14-Jun-22 28-Jun-22 South Dakota 29-Mar-22 7-Jun-22 16-Aug-22 Tennessee 7-Apr-22 4-Aug-22 Texas 13-Dec-21 1-Mar-22 24-May-22 Utah 17-Mar-22 28-Jun-22 Vermont 26-May-22 9-Aug-22 Virginia 30-Mar-22 21-Jun-22 Washington 20-May-22 2-Aug-22 West Virginia 29-Jan-22 10-May-22 Wisconsin 1-Jun-22 9-Aug-22 Wyoming 27-May-22 16-Aug-22 RUNOFFS Primary runoffs between the top two vote-getters may take place in some states if no candidate receives over a certain threshold of the vote in the primary: 30% in North Carolina (only if requested by the runner-up) 35% in South Dakota 50% in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas. Georgia conducts a general election runoff between the top two vote-getters on Dec. 6 if no candidate receives a majority on Nov. 8. Louisiana conducts a general election runoff between the top two vote-getters on Dec. 10 if no candidate receives a majority on Nov. 8. FILING DEADLINES All filing deadlines on the calendar above are for major-party candidates and only apply to congressional and statewide races unless noted below. Independent and third-party candidates, or contests for other races, may be subject to different deadlines. California’s filing deadline is extended to Mar. 16 in races where no incumbents file for re-election. Kansas’ filing deadline for congressional candidates is extended to Jun. 10 if new congressional maps are not approved by May 10. Massachusetts requires candidates to file with local election officials by May 10; then, they must file again with the commonwealth secretary by Jun. 7. Therefore, the first step is necessary but not sufficient for candidates to appear on the primary ballot. Nebraska’s filing deadline for incumbents, regardless of whether they seek re-election or another office, is Feb. 15. Utah requires candidates to file a declaration of candidacy with the lieutenant governor’s office by Mar. 17, then either submit sufficient signatures 14 days before the candidate’s party’s convention or win sufficient support at that party convention. The first step is therefore necessary but not sufficient for candidates to appear on the primary ballot. CONVENTIONS Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, and Utah parties typically conduct conventions prior to their primaries that can impact primary ballot access. Indiana, Michigan, and South Dakota parties select nomine

Daily Kos Elections 2022 primary calendar

Below you’ll find Daily Kos Elections’ calendar of major-party filing deadlines, primaries, and runoffs for the 2022 elections. For a chronological version of this calendar, click here. Beneath the table, you’ll find detailed notes on requirements for runoffs, exceptions to filing deadlines, and important conventions.

State Filing Primary Runoff Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin Wyoming
28-Jan-22 24-May-22 21-Jun-22
1-Jun-22 16-Aug-22
4-Apr-22 2-Aug-22
1-Mar-22 24-May-22 21-Jun-22
11-Mar-22 7-Jun-22
15-Mar-22 28-Jun-22
7-Jun-22 9-Aug-22
12-Jul-22 13-Sep-22
17-Jun-22 23-Aug-22
11-Mar-22 24-May-22 26-Jul-22
7-Jun-22 13-Aug-22
11-Mar-22 17-May-22
14-Mar-22 28-Jun-22
4-Feb-22 3-May-22
18-Mar-22 7-Jun-22
1-Jun-22 2-Aug-22
7-Jan-22 17-May-22
22-Jul-22 8-Nov-22 10-Dec-22
15-Mar-22 14-Jun-22
22-Feb-22 28-Jun-22

10-May-22

20-Sep-22
19-Apr-22 2-Aug-22
31-May-22 9-Aug-22
1-Mar-22 7-Jun-22 28-Jun-21
29-Mar-22 2-Aug-22
14-Mar-22 7-Jun-22
1-Mar-22 10-May-22
18-Mar-22 14-Jun-22
10-Jun-22 13-Sep-22
4-Apr-22 7-Jun-22
1-Feb-22 7-Jun-22
7-Apr-22 28-Jun-22
17-Dec-21 8-Mar-22 17-May-22
11-Apr-22 14-Jun-22
2-Feb-22 3-May-22
15-Apr-22 28-Jun-22 23-Aug-22
8-Mar-22 17-May-22
8-Mar-22 17-May-22
29-Jun-22 13-Sep-22
30-Mar-22 14-Jun-22 28-Jun-22
29-Mar-22 7-Jun-22 16-Aug-22
7-Apr-22 4-Aug-22
13-Dec-21 1-Mar-22 24-May-22
17-Mar-22 28-Jun-22
26-May-22 9-Aug-22
30-Mar-22 21-Jun-22
20-May-22 2-Aug-22
29-Jan-22 10-May-22
1-Jun-22 9-Aug-22
27-May-22 16-Aug-22

RUNOFFS

  • Primary runoffs between the top two vote-getters may take place in some states if no candidate receives over a certain threshold of the vote in the primary:
    • 30% in North Carolina (only if requested by the runner-up)
    • 35% in South Dakota
    • 50% in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, South Carolina, and Texas.
  • Georgia conducts a general election runoff between the top two vote-getters on Dec. 6 if no candidate receives a majority on Nov. 8.
  • Louisiana conducts a general election runoff between the top two vote-getters on Dec. 10 if no candidate receives a majority on Nov. 8.

FILING DEADLINES

  • All filing deadlines on the calendar above are for major-party candidates and only apply to congressional and statewide races unless noted below. Independent and third-party candidates, or contests for other races, may be subject to different deadlines.
  • California’s filing deadline is extended to Mar. 16 in races where no incumbents file for re-election.
  • Kansas’ filing deadline for congressional candidates is extended to Jun. 10 if new congressional maps are not approved by May 10.
  • Massachusetts requires candidates to file with local election officials by May 10; then, they must file again with the commonwealth secretary by Jun. 7. Therefore, the first step is necessary but not sufficient for candidates to appear on the primary ballot.
  • Nebraska’s filing deadline for incumbents, regardless of whether they seek re-election or another office, is Feb. 15.
  • Utah requires candidates to file a declaration of candidacy with the lieutenant governor’s office by Mar. 17, then either submit sufficient signatures 14 days before the candidate’s party’s convention or win sufficient support at that party convention. The first step is therefore necessary but not sufficient for candidates to appear on the primary ballot.

CONVENTIONS

  • Colorado, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, and Utah parties typically conduct conventions prior to their primaries that can impact primary ballot access.
  • Indiana, Michigan, and South Dakota parties select nominees for downballot statewide office (such as attorney general and secretary of state) at conventions.
  • Iowa parties conduct conventions to select nominees if no candidate receives over 35% of the vote in the primary.
  • Minnesota parties conduct conventions after which candidates who fail to win their party’s endorsement often (but by no means always) drop out.
  • Virginia parties, at their discretion, may select nominees at conventions rather than via primaries.

We’ll have more details regarding the dates of these conventions as they’re announced. 

Sources: Green Papers; FEC; NCSL; state elections sites and statutes